THE JOURNEY

LATEST BLOGS

Shelley McMurtrie
20 Aug 2015 - 17:00
Outputs
Freshwater Ecology
50 Degrees South Trust, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition - tarns
50 Degrees South Trust, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition - tarns
50 Degrees South Trust, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition - tarns
50 Degrees South Trust, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition - tarns
50 Degrees South Trust, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition - tarns

By Krystyna Saunders:

As part of the CIBE expedition, I spent seven weeks on Campbell Island sampling 45 lakes, tarns and ponds all over the island. At each site we collected water and sediment samples. Back in the lab at the University of Bern, Switzerland, I analysed...

Shelley McMurtrie
9 Jul 2014 - 17:40
Outputs
Freshwater Ecology
EOS Ecology Campbell Island invertebrate key
EOS Ecology Campbell Island invertebrate key
EOS Ecology Campbell Island invertebrate key
EOS Ecology Campbell Island invertebrate key
EOS Ecology Campbell Island invertebrate key
EOS Ecology Campbell Island invertebrate key
EOS Ecology Campbell Island invertebrate key

The first ever interactive identification keys to the freshwater invertebrates of Campbell Island have been published online (McMurtrie, Sinton & Winterbourn, 2014).

The 2010 Bicentennial Expedition is now a distant memory but one that will ever remain in the hearts and minds of those of us who had the...

Shelley McMurtrie
25 Jun 2014 - 18:53
Outputs
Freshwater Ecology
50 Degrees South Trust, Campbell Island, invertebrate identification key
50 Degrees South Trust, Campbell Island, invertebrate identification key
50 Degrees South Trust, Campbell Island, invertebrate identification key
50 Degrees South Trust, Campbell Island, invertebrate identification key
50 Degrees South Trust, Campbell Island, invertebrate identification key
50 Degrees South Trust, Campbell Island, invertebrate identification key

It’s a proud day when a scientist has a discovery named after her. In the field of invertebrates the chance of finding a new species is certainly greater than say working in the field of mammals, but even so, it is a rare privilege and one thing on my bucket list that I didn't think I would ever tick off.  In my case, my surname (McMurtrie) is being shared with a tiny worm (...

Shelley McMurtrie
6 Jan 2014 - 17:07
Research Areas
Terrestrial Ecology
50 Degrees South Trust, Spruce tree on Campbell Island

An unruly, wind-blown, 100-year-old spruce tree on subantarctic Campbell Island is possibly the world's loneliest tree. Veronika Meduna visited it earlier in December 2013 with Jonathan Palmer, who analysed its tree rings to study the...

Shelley McMurtrie
13 May 2013 - 20:26
Outputs
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, artist
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, artist
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, artist

Artists Ben Reid and Annabel Menzies-Joyce came down to Campbell Island during our mid-term resupply. They were there to experience the island through different eyes to the researchers and to interact with the research teams to understand the work that the expedition was doing. Out of this they would be able to tell the story of Campbell Island and its recovery from two centuries of human influence in a different way to that of the research outputs. Ben and Annabel have both achieved a...

Shelley McMurtrie
27 Feb 2013 - 21:29
Outputs
Ben Reid, Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, 50 Degrees South Trust
Ben Reid, Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, 50 Degrees South Trust
Ben Reid, Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, 50 Degrees South Trust
Ben Reid, Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, 50 Degrees South Trust
Ben Reid, Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, 50 Degrees South Trust
50 Degrees South Trust
Ben Reid, Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, 50 Degrees South Trust
Ben Reid, Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, 50 Degrees South Trust
Ben Reid, Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, 50 Degrees South Trust
Ben Reid, Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, 50 Degrees South Trust

It’s been a long time coming but, I have finally produced work in response to my time spent on Campbell Island. I have succeeded in completing 12 new original prints in time for the first show on the 27th of February in Wellington.

Making the commitment to hold five exhibitions to show my prints eight months out, with none of the printing done and with only some loose ideas of what I’m going to do and how...

Shelley McMurtrie
21 Jul 2012 - 09:00
Outputs
Technical Assistance
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, Mark Crompton, The Gaurdian
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, Mark Crompton, The Gaurdian

After 44 years reading the weather, and seven years combined time on Campbell Island (the longest combined time on the island) manning New Zealand's most southern meteorological station, it is time for Mark to hang up the thermometer.

Mark was a key support personnel on the Campbell Island expedition - downloading and interpreting weather maps every night so that we knew what kind of weather was in store for us on the following days. Without Marks interpretation we would not...

Norm Judd
30 Jun 2012 - 11:30
Outputs
History and Archaeology
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: Monument Harbour eddies
A WRECK IN THE HARBOUR?
Lack of drift material in Monument Harbour

In January 2007, Chris, Matt and I clambered amongst the large boulders along Monument Harbour’s eastern coast to the harbour entrance.  We saw no flotsam.  I took...

Norm Judd
23 Jun 2012 - 11:30
Research Areas
History and Archaeology
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: Monument Harbour
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: The Maia in Monument Harbour
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: Six Foot Lake descent from Puiseux Peak
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: timber beam, monument harbour
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: timber beam, monument harbour
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: timber beam, monument harbour
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: timber beam, monument
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: timber beam, monument harbour
WHAT THE CAMPBELL ISLAND BICENTENNIAL EXPEDITION (CIBE) FOUND IN 2011

In December 2010, and January and February 2011, the Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, (CIBE) was on Campbell Island.  The cultural heritage team; archaeologists Steve Bagley and Nigel...

Norm Judd
16 Jun 2012 - 11:30
Outputs
History and Archaeology
Campbell Island : location of Monument Harbour
Campbell Island : timber beam in Monument Harbour
Campbell Island : timber beam in Monument Harbour
Campbell Island : timber plank in Monument Harbour
Campbell Island : timber plank in Monument Harbour
Campbell Island : timber beam in Monument Harbour
Campbell Island : timber beam in Monument Harbour
Campbell Island : timber plank and sea lions in Monument Harbour
Campbell Island : elephant seal in Monument Harbour
Campbell Island : timber beam in Monument Harbour
Campbell Island : timber plank in Monument Harbour
THE 2007 SURVEY

We arrived on New Year’s Eve 2006 and tramped to the site with guidance from Department of Conservation officer, Matt Charteris.

We found the beam on the west side of the stream from Six Foot Lake (see first image). A few rods and a small amount of timber were all that we could see of the beam (see second image). Then Matt found a plank of similar age on the east side of the stream.

...
Norm Judd
9 Jun 2012 - 11:30
Outputs
History and Archaeology
Campbell Island : log of wood,Monument Harbour, 1972
Campbell Island : log of wood,Monument Harbour, 1972

1972: Sixty years after the whalers, in January 1972, a weather station technician, Chris Glasson, tramped to a bay somewhere on Campbell Island’s southern coast.  Here Chris saw a large timber beam with iron spikes sticking out of the peat.  

It had been unearthed by wallowing elephant seals and Chris thought that the iron spikes protruding from the beam had discouraged the monsters from dislodging and...

Norm Judd
26 May 2012 - 11:30
Outputs
History and Archaeology
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: 1810 chart of Campbell Island
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: 1912 Campbell Is whaler picture frame
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: 1912 Campbell Is whaler picture frame
EARLY EVIDENCE

1874: Among several Campbell Island wreck reports of the 1800s, is the following from the December 1874 edition of Nature translated from the French, being part of an account by a French Expedition to Witness the Transit of Venus on Campbell Island that year [iii].

Where was this supposedly metaphorical middle of Campbell Island?  

"While exploring the island they found...

Norm Judd
11 May 2012 - 17:00
Outputs
History and Archaeology
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: South-western coastline Campbell Island
INTRODUCTION

Since 1976, my initial interest had been for the terrestrial historic sites of Campbell Island.  One wreck only was recorded on Campbell Island; that of the sealing brig Perseverance in 1828.  Two the crew of were drowned [i].   But over time I increasingly wondered about the bulwarks, parts of ship’s boats, planks and spars, old and new that had been seen in North West Bay in the mid to late ...

Shelley McMurtrie
20 Dec 2011 - 18:00
Outputs
Freshwater Ecology
Christchurch earthquake, Campbell Island Bicentenary Expedition
Christchurch earthquake, Campbell Island Bicentenary Expedition
Christchurch earthquake, Campbell Island Bicentenary Expedition
Christchurch earthquake at EOS Ecology, Campbell Island Bicentenary Expedition
Christchurch earthquake at EOS Ecology, Campbell Island Bicentenary Expedition
Christchurch earthquake at EOS Ecology, Campbell Island Bicentenary Expedition
Processing samples at EOS Ecology, Campbell Island Bicentenary Expedition

A lot has happened since we returned on the 11 February to Christchurch from our expedition to Campbell Island. A devastating earthquake 11 days after our return and then another in June were among the more memorable (memorable for all for the wrong reasons) happenings. The February quake sent our freezer in the EOS Ecology lab flying and our irreplaceable 200-odd invertebrate samples thrown to the floor. It was a small miracle that they all survived the shake-up, and our gas-powered...

Shelley McMurtrie
17 Dec 2011 - 18:00
Island Life
CIBE Team
Timber under the Hostel at Beeman Base, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition
Rubbish under the Hostel at Beeman Base, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition
Steve Croasdale, flaky pastry, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition
Steve Croasdale, flaky pastry, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition
Steve Croasdale, flaky pastry, Mountford, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expeditio
Rolling pin, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition

Steve Croasdale was our ‘can do’ handy man on the expedition. While he didn’t pop up a lot in our island blogs he was always there working away on repairing and maintaining the base camp buildings on behalf of the Met Service.

Part of this involved clearing out the rubbish that had accumulated under the floor of the Hostel building for many years. A number of strange items came out of that pile, but among...

Norm Judd
12 Nov 2011 - 18:00
Research Areas
History and Archaeology
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition-lady of the heather ghost story
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition-lady of the heather ghost story
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition-lady of the heather ghost story
While we await the cultural heritage team’s report, I’ll entertain you with a yarn. 
 
I thought that this could be a ghost story: but that’s a populist approach and I don’t believe in ghosts.  There’s either a technical reason for what I’m about to tell you or the phenomenon was just simple coincidence.
 
When I first went to Campbell Island, my Dept. of Lands and Survey brief...
Norm Judd
16 Oct 2011 - 17:00
Outputs
History and Archaeology
Discovery of historic sod hut, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition
stunning view, six foot lake, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition
historic finger post, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition
native ferns, near Southeast Harbour, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition
historic shipwreck timber, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition

The basic reporting on the ‘what’ and ‘where’ of the Heritage Team’s work is nearing completion. Site records will be sent for inclusion in the New Zealand Archaeological Association (NZAA) Site Record File, which is the central repository accessed by the NZ Historic Places Trust, Department of Conservation and any researcher or other interested...

Shelley McMurtrie
30 Jul 2011 - 15:53
Outputs
Terrestrial Ecology
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition

Alex Fergus is giving a talk for the botanical society of Otago about the dramatic vegetation changes over the last 200 years of human occupation of Campbell Island.

The talk is on the 10th August 2011. Find out more at:
http://www.botany.otago.ac.nz/bso/...

Carla Meurk
14 Feb 2011 - 19:29
Research Areas
Human Interactions
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition

Now that the team are back on the mainland it is time to consolidate our island research into publications. With respect to two of my projects data collection from Campbell constitutes one component of a wider research agenda requiring further empirical research. The first of these two projects focuses on the history and anthropology of scientific endeavour on Campbell and the influence of changing bureaucracies of science funding and management; the second will utilise a network analysis...

Carla Meurk
14 Feb 2011 - 19:19
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition

In the final days of the CIBE I was kept busy engaging with the tourists aboard the Spirit of Enderby, other CIBE team members tidied up fieldwork and Steve C. boarded up the windows of the Met Service building, our home for the past 9 weeks, to protect the glass panes from storm damage as the Island will be uninhabited by people until next summer. Having loved my time on Campbell I was not looking forward to ‘normal’ life; I contemplated with dread having to check my email and...

Shelley McMurtrie
7 Feb 2011 - 21:13
Candid Moments
Pleurophyllum in flower
Southeast Harbour
Monument Harbour from Pizeau Peak
Shelley sampling
Itchy nose
Blurtas
Sea lion
Sea lion
Campbell Island Shag
Skua
Campbell Island Teal
Yellow-eyed penguin
Campbell Island Snipe
Farewell party

The field component of our CIBE programme is almost complete. Tomorrow (the 8th February) we will be loading our gear onto the Naval vessel HMS Wellington and leaving the shelter of the Perseverance Harbour on the 9th to head back home.  

This will be my last before making the trip home, as tonight the BGAN satellite will be packed away ready for loading. There are many blogs and videos yet to come, to cover all the trips and experiences here, but they will have to wait until...

Alex Fergus
7 Feb 2011 - 20:45
Island Life

I feel that little niggle. That wee worry. After 9 weeks on an isolated island with a small group of people, how will I handle returning to the outside world? Will I become a bewildered hermit, unable to operate in groups larger than 10? The answer is probably yes, but it doesn’t much matter as Carla and I have hashed a plan. To ease back into society, we will use Stewart Island as a stepping stone. The rough plan is to convert the Meurk’s holiday hut into a research lab for a...

Alex Fergus
7 Feb 2011 - 20:11
Research Areas
Terrestrial Ecology
Clearing the nets
Cutting down nets
Folding the nets
Mountford 2008 Chardonnay
Mountford 2008 Chardonnay

60 days of snow, rain, hail and gale has pelted the six 3 metre long insect nets that I installed with Steve C., Carla and Jo’s help just south of the base after our arrival. Against the demons of weather, the nets have stood strong, no doubt due to the clever hand of the net constructor, my Ma, and her sewing machine.

For 2 months I have daily cleared the amassed invertebrate treasure, often with Carla’s assistance, and with Carla and Mark covering for me when I have...

Norm Judd
5 Feb 2011 - 20:57
Candid Moments
History and Archaeology
Steve & Nelly

Expedition members are winding down their field visits, packing away equipment, samples and supplies for the return home and doing last minute checks on research to make sure there are no gaps that will definitely turn their results into toast on arrival home (after 9 February there’ll be no going back to Campbell Island for a quick look).

With all the bustle of closing down the expedition I am reminded of the 1916 Campbell Island farm station diary in which the headman wrote...

Colin Meurk
5 Feb 2011 - 20:45
Candid Moments
CIBE Team
Swamps & Carla
Carla
Carla
Carla & Colin
Alex F
Re-used lunch paper
Mallow puff daisy
Albatross & daisy
Harbour lights
Harbour lights

Well ‘swamps’ did warn us from day one! “There are only 64 days left before we sail back to the mainland. And when you take out Christmas, New Year, bad weather, ship visits, sea lion bites, etc.; well, you might as well pack up now”! Swamps, alias Mark Crompton, weather observer, is the official ray of sunshine. But in a sense he was right. The 9 weeks at the beginning seemed to stretch out forever into the...

Norm Judd
2 Feb 2011 - 20:32
Research Areas
Terrestrial EcologyHistory and Archaeology
The Bivvy - 1981
The Bivvy - 2011

Many of the historic sites that were easily seen in 1981 are now obscured by scrub and other vegetation. I have included two images here that show the rate of vegetative growth on Campbell Island over the last 30 years.

The first image is one I took on my 1981 visit to the island. It shows posts and a central pole of what may have been a small tent camp from the early farming era beginning 1895 – a site now known as the ‘Bivvy’. In the middle distance are two...

Carla Meurk
29 Jan 2011 - 20:27
Island Life
Terrestrial Ecology
Missing data

Unfortunately, in spite of our best efforts, we will leave the island without complete datasets ...

[Carla Meurk]

Carla Meurk
28 Jan 2011 - 20:21
Island Life
Human Interactions
View from Mt Honey
View from Mt Paris
Southern tip of NZ
Megaherb fields
View from Mt Paris

In this, my last blog from Campbell, I thought I’d compile a list of highlights and lowlights experienced on the Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition 2010/2011:

Lowlights:
5: Sinking knee deep in peat and being unable to pull my leg out without lying down in the mud and spreading myself out as much as I could in order to free myself and thinking ‘this must be how the Moa felt’.
4: Crawling on my hands and knees through the scratchy Draco more...

Norm Judd
27 Jan 2011 - 20:11
Island Life
CIBE TeamTechnical Assistance
Colin welcoming Norm
The Maia
Watties, what else
Mince pie time
Mince pie and wine
C4 coffee
Survival Kit Company
Broken window

This is a personal thank you to all the individuals and organisations that have made the archaeological assessment of Campbell Island’s historic sites possible. It is an all time first.

This thank you comes a little early because the expedition is not yet over but I’ve seen and experienced enough to know that the expedition would not have been possible without sponsorship, donations, and technical support and assistance.

From a personal point of view the most...

Carla Meurk
27 Jan 2011 - 20:05
Island Life
Bulbinella
Pleurophyllum
Damniminia
Gentian
Christmas colours

When we arrived I commented that I was experiencing an unusual spring; we arrived to blooming Bulbinella, vomiting Giant Petrel chicks and I spent time in an Albatross colony full of babies. (NB: For those interested, Orange 83 continues to do well).

The GP chicks are losing their down and starting to flex their wings, they will fledge soon, and the Bulbinella...

Norm Judd
26 Jan 2011 - 21:53
Research Areas
History and Archaeology
Peat brick layer
Peat brick profile
Try works site

Yesterday the History Team of Steve, Nigel and Norm walked to a site believed to have once held a try pot or try pots for rendering seal or whale blubber. It’s not too far from Beeman Camp where we are staying and we are thankful for this as we still have lots of walking to do to finish our research projects by 4 February. (In addition, the average age for our team is 64.3 making ours the oldest team by far. We three agree our knees have seen better days and have talked about getting...

Carla Meurk
26 Jan 2011 - 21:47
Island Life
Human Interactions
Skill 6

My previous list neglected one important fieldwork capability. In the interests of completeness I thought I’d add fieldwork skill number 6: Learn to be comfortable toileting anywhere, and in any weather.

[Carla Meurk]

Alex Fergus
25 Jan 2011 - 20:35
Research Areas
The loneliest tree
An official beginning
My support team
The inner workings
Manoeuvring
Near the top
Top of main trunk
The tree top
The tree top
I was pretty chuffed
Whittaker’s celebration
I earned it
Trigonometric measure

I am the last person to ever ascend the loneliest tree in the world. I did this earlier today, and I am on a bit of a high as a result. I have joined a legion of eminent New Zealand naturalists, among them Sorensen (1945), Godley (1969) and Meurk (1975+) who have measured the height of the Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis) at Camp Cove. Lord Ranfurly planted the tree in 1907 and from the 1940’s onward it has been repeatedly measured, in part for posterity, in part because it is an...

Norm Judd
24 Jan 2011 - 21:42
Research Areas
History and Archaeology
Timber pieces
Bottle

On 21 January, the History Team (Steve, Nigel and Norm) walked over to the North West Bay hut. This was our base for visiting nearby sites. In cold and blustery north easterlies the following day, we carefully traversed Sandy Bay avoiding ‘beach master’ sea lions (otherwise known in Met. Station terms as ‘monsters’) and then climbed 35 metres onto Complex Point. Pushing through tussock, ‘draco’ and fern, we arrived at the knoll at the end of the point....

Norm Judd
24 Jan 2011 - 21:27
Research Areas
History and Archaeology
Cave below bluffs
Cave entrance
Bowl contents
Contents closeup
View from cave

I left you in my last blog crawling through the draco in search of Fred Blogg’s Cave above North East Harbour.

We sidled below the long line of bluffs and the cave soon appeared above us; a dark, overhanging cavern offering shelter from rain and wind and the floor was dry. On Campbell Island this is a boon.

In the centre of the cave floor sat a large alloy bowl, its alloy lid anchored by a large rock. After photographs and measurements we carefully removed the rock...

Carla Meurk
22 Jan 2011 - 20:43
Island Life
Human Interactions
Col-Lyall Saddle
Lyall Ridge
The Clag
Drying laundry
A shorts and t-shirt day?

Walking through a sea lion colony yesterday, Campbell’s wind thwarted my planned blogging activities. As I simultaneously counted live and dead sea lion pups, kept an eye on the Bulls (‘beach masters’) and minded my step on an exposed rocky outcrop in screaming wind, I was unable to add a fifth task of photography. Sadly, therefore, this experience of life (and death) in the subantarctic went un-pictured. I would love to have captured the cute yet devilish image of baby...

Shelley McMurtrie
21 Jan 2011 - 21:11
Research Areas
Freshwater Ecology
New plant record
Albatross on north face
Lunch time
On summit of Honey
Honey summit view
Matching photo points
Plant transect
Two tarns to sample
Tarn sampling

Today dawned in spectacular fashion with calm waters and not a cloud in the sky. Given the fine, windless day and the arrival of the Orion tourist ship, a planned trip up the Col Ridge with botanist Colin Meurk was soon changed to an ascent of Mt Honey from the north face, rather than the usual track up the west flank. Mount Honey is often covered in clag (low cloud) so we had to make...

Alex Fergus
21 Jan 2011 - 20:25
Research Areas
Hydra
My quarry
Chop
The scramble back

A Hydra writhed below my feet, waves’ crashed beyond my right shoulder, and somewhere high above me my pack hung off a ledge. This is adventure science in action, and easily exaggerated. With only 19 days left on the island we have to complete our field research program in less than ideal conditions. Jo, Colin and I have been at Penguin Bay this week collecting soils, plants and insects in order to study how the massive decline in Rockhopper Penguin numbers is influencing other...

Carla Meurk
21 Jan 2011 - 20:18
Island Life
Human Interactions
Pants
Pants
Shoes
iPod
Back
Waist belt

Many ecologists (and anthropologists for that matter) describe how the love of fieldwork was an important motivator in their choice of degree and career path. For those wishing to proceed along the research trajectory nowadays a PhD is a necessary prerequisite. However, there are many fieldwork skills that your university education will not teach you. To assist the budding fieldworker, I have compiled a handy list of skills required in the field:

1.    Learn to sew,...

Colin Meurk
20 Jan 2011 - 21:07
Candid Moments
Bites healing well
Sea lion pup

The sea lion bites are healing well – getting to the itchy stage and am off the antibiotics. That experience has made me a tad cautious – verging on the paranoid, as I poke under every tussock and fern in my travels around the coast - where there is a possibility of another close encounter. Like this evening on the board walk – got past one sea lion beside the track and almost immediately encountered another – or rather an amorous couple of sea lions – biting...

Steve Bagley
20 Jan 2011 - 21:01
Research Areas
History and Archaeology
The old stove
GP
View from Farmhouse site
Tucker Cove Farmhouse

Yesterday I was at the Farmhouse site, which is tucked fairly snugly (as far as any place can be called snug on Campbell) into the gently sloping southern shore of Tucker Cove. Of course the house, woolshed and store shed are long gone and only the most durable bits and the stone structures such as the old boat haul-out give any sign that this was once the centre of life on the Island.

I was painting metal preservative on the old Shacklock ‘Orion’ stove under the...

Carla Meurk
20 Jan 2011 - 20:53
Island Life
Human Interactions
Coring a lake

Now, I don’t like to complain ... but this past week has been more difficult than most. My energy has waned, my knees are achy and it’s been quite quite cold. My pack’s waist belt snapped and a top strap has gone as well. The deterioration of my gear, fatigue and an insatiable appetite is helping me adjust to the prospect of returning home in just over 2 weeks.

Still, I didn’t want to miss the opportunity to assist Paleolimnologist Dr Krystyna Saunders...

Norm Judd
19 Jan 2011 - 21:13
Candid Moments
History and Archaeology
Charging up the hill

Many year’s ago, someone said I must try to find So-and-So’s cave on Campbell Island. I can’t remember So-and-So’s name but let’s say it was Fred Blogg. His cave was said to be high up on the northern slopes of Campbell Island’s North East Harbour. Campbell Island is remote. Fred Blogg’s cave is remote on Campbell Island. The last time someone went there must have been in the 50’s or 60’s. Or so they said. And they found an old enamel...

Colin Meurk
19 Jan 2011 - 20:42
Island Life
Anisotome latifolia
Pleurophyllum criniferum and subantarctic onion
Fogged out
Erebus Point
Prickly shield fern
Water fern
Kiokio
Gentian and lichen
Bull kelp
Pleurophyllum speciosum
Elfin woods
Coastal rocks and tussock
Millpond harbour
Remains of Tucker Camp

Light, shade, colour, texture, form and continual change make the visual experience of Campbell Island. The never-ending variety of patterns, like tapestries in and out of focus, will be among my memories of this place. It’s also been rather cold over the last couple of days - but now the wind has dropped and slanting golden rays of the setting sun are washing across the foot of Mt Honey on the other side of the harbour and we can hope for a couple of days of settled weather! As an...

Norm Judd
19 Jan 2011 - 20:25
Research Areas
History and Archaeology
Nigel and Steve
Large sod hut in Tucker Cove

It’s interesting how one easily forgets feelings of dire dread. I’d tramped these island hills in all weathers; mapping and surveying historic sites on and off for over 30 years and the feeling of dread came to me then only once or twice - that I might not make it back to the warmth and comfort of the weather station. Now the station is automated, there is no staff - all cooking and heating facilities have been removed. We are actually camping inside a gutted building with the...

Alex Fergus
18 Jan 2011 - 19:52
Island Life
Steve C's award
Mark's award
Alex F and Carla's award
Jo's award
Colin's award

Leaving 9 people alone on a cold, windy and wet Subantarctic island can put strain on social relations. Some voices are louder than others. Some appetites are greater than others. And some opinions are stronger than others. Such social tensions can cause small groups to split into sadistic teams of gossip mongering loathsome ghouls. Naturally with our smiling kiwi dispositions (and beaming American and Australian ones) this fate has yet to befall our team (which has swollen to 11 after the...

Mark Crompton
16 Jan 2011 - 21:35
Island Life
Ascending Mt Honey
Ascending Mt Honey
Mark and sea lion
Ascending Mt Honey in the snow

I have climbed Mt Honey on Campbell Island many times, the last before the Bicentennial Expedition being 19 years ago in 1991. During the term of this expedition I have repeated the ascent twice and am convinced that it has either got higher or that the Earth’s gravitational field has increased locally due to some anomalous relativistic effect. Other explanations are not being entertained.

[Mark (Swamps) Crompton]

Carla Meurk
16 Jan 2011 - 20:59
Island Life
Freshwater Ecology
Boat route
Six Foot Lake islet
Snack break
Six Foot Lake
Campbell Island Teal

With midterm resupply we’ve had the Maia at our disposal, transportation we utilised to access Six Foot Lake. Campbell’s tea-coloured lake is located on the south side of the island where it accentuates a landscape of flaxen tones; scattered animal bones, scavenging Skuas and Giant Petrels cloak the lakeshore...

Shelley McMurtrie
15 Jan 2011 - 21:45
Candid Moments
CIBE Team
Bringing the Maia's tender aboard
Eddie - Maia crew member
Maia's plush interior
Alex and Shelley
Alex and Annabel
Garden Cove team photo
Colin, Shelley, Ben, and Annabel
Farewelling the Maia
Maia at anchor

It is 10.30pm and I am just back from taking photos in the waning light and persistent drizzle. The base is quiet with the Maia having just left, sounding its fog horn as it lifted anchor and drifted off into the rain and mist. In a way it is like the silence that descends on a house when the kids have gone back to school, that seems all the more quiet after the fun and laughter of the school holidays (funny I should be using that simile given that I have no children of my own!). With our...

Colin Meurk
15 Jan 2011 - 21:40
Research Areas
Terrestrial Ecology
Diminutive Comb Fern
Microherb
Flowers of a Mat Coprosma
Onion-leaved Orchid
Prasophyllum
Two Kiokio Fern Species
Two Kiokio Fern Species
Kiokio Fern

There are many things that draw people to studying and exploring nature. Just being able to experience the miracle of life in the course of your work is a great privilege – even if most of the time you are desk-bound and enveloped in the tedium of writing grant applications. Anyway, I digress. This is about those moments of personal and scientific discovery – finding something never known before. These can be grandiose theories and principles; but I get a thrill out of much...

Mark Crompton
15 Jan 2011 - 21:06
Island Life
Colin's Birthday Meal
Colin's Birthday Bottle of Wine
Colin's Birthday Toast
Colin's Birthday Cake
Colin's Birthday - Father and Daughter

The leader of the Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition (CIBE), Colin Meurk, is 64 today. I met Colin over 40 years ago on Campbell Island when he came down as a member of the 1970 Wildlife Expedition. We were young then and had dreams and aspirations. Some have been realised, some not – that is life. I have a birthday present for Colin and I think that here on Campbell Island is the perfect place for it to be delineated. Some of it he has already received, some is ongoing.

...
Alex Fergus
15 Jan 2011 - 21:02
Island Life
History and Archaeology
1888
1970
2011

This island of ours has a surprisingly rich and well documented European history, given how inaccessible the old girl is. Many of the previous expeditions and leisure trips have documented the island from the very early days of Subantarctic exploration. William Dougall and his Southland team were among the first folks to venture south on a photographic sojourn to Campbell...

Shelley McMurtrie
15 Jan 2011 - 20:49
Candid Moments
CIBE Team
CIBE Team
CIBE Team
CIBE Team plus Artists
CIBE Team plus Artists and Maia Crew

With the Maia here for four days we had the opportunity to follow the time honoured tradition of taking an expedition team photo. The usual place for this is down at the wharf by the ‘Welcome to Campbell Island’ sign, but the island had other plans for us. We awoke this morning to steady rain and low cloud that gave the definite impression that it had comfortably settled in with its feet up, and had no intention of moving on for some time.

The process of taking any type...

Nigel Prickett
12 Jan 2011 - 19:34
Research Areas
History and Archaeology
Three whaling trypots
Three whaling trypots
View of Northeast Harbour
Shoreline stonework
A loose brick
Remnant of the wooden jetty
Looking down Northeast Harbour
The Maia at anchor

On a point at the head of Northeast Harbour on Campbell Island are well preserved remains of the 1911-14 Cook whaling station. The island was the last frontier of the New Zealand right whale industry, which began in the 1820s at Preservation Inlet and Te Awaiti, Tory Channel. In only a few years most stations brought to an end the ancient winter use of their bay or harbour by calving female right whales. For 30 years before 1964 not a single right whale was reported on the New Zealand...

Alex Fergus
10 Jan 2011 - 20:04
Island Life
Rockhopper Penguin
Rockhopper Penguin Chicken
You're Too Close
Fashion Accessory?
Nest Building Materials
Skua On The Hunt
Penguin Monitoring

It sucks to be a Rockhopper penguin! This is the great biological principle I have uncovered after hanging out with these wee fella’s for six days midway through their breeding season. Rockhoppers are the smallest of the crested penguins, the next size up in penguin styles from the little Blue penguin. Penguin styles in all run from 40 cm standing (little Blue Penguins) through to 115 cm (the Emperor Penguins). At this time of year most of the Rockhopper chickens are about three...

Alex James
9 Jan 2011 - 21:55
Island Life
Sea Lion Pup
Sea Lion
Royal Albatross
Skua Chick

Many people come to Campbell Island to experience not only the wild scenery but also the wildlife. They want to see elephant seals snorting, sea lions swimming, royal albatross gamming, penguins playing, pipits investigating, skuas stealing their gear, and teal posing for a photograph. The brochures and glossy books are filled with photos of wildlife. However seeing a photo of wilddeath is rarer than getting a photo of a snipe. By wilddeath I mean the dead and decayed bodies of the island...

Colin Meurk
9 Jan 2011 - 21:35
Island Life
CIBE Team
Campbell Island Pipit
Happy Quadrating
After The Encounter
Tooth Marks
Concerned Medical Man
A Concerned Daugther
Puncture Wounds
The Attacker

While in this World Heritage location we have to be especially careful to avoid damaging the environment and disturbing the wildlife. We endeavour to apply the 5 m rule – giving any birds or marine mammals a wide berth. Of course there is nothing in the manual about the wildlife disturbing us! For example, pipits don’t (as Pete McClelland succinctly puts it) observe the 5 m rule and frequently slow down ‘traffic’ by insisting on running along the tracks in front of...

Steve Wagstaff
9 Jan 2011 - 21:22
Research Areas
Terrestrial Ecology
Panoramic View
P. Criniferum And Hookeri Hybrid
Pleurophyllum Criniferum Habit
Damnamenia Vernicosa Flower
Pleurophyllum Speciosum Flower

Early botanists exploring Campbell Island were astounded by the lush herbaceous plants that they called megaherbs. Megaherbs encompass a diverse array of plants including Bulbinella, Stilbocarpa, and Anisotome, but the large showy daisies in the genus Pleurophyllum are arguably the most striking. Three species are included in the genus, which is endemic to the subantarctic islands. All three are found on Campbell Island. They hybridize in various combinations, which suggests reproductive...

Carla Meurk
9 Jan 2011 - 21:12
Island Life
Human Interactions
Sipping On C4
The Ships Have Sailed
Talking To Mum

This past week has been a particularly busy one with mid-term resupply happening from the 10th to the 13th of January. As resident social scientist, I am beginning to interview our departing team members whilst also engaging with the visiting tourists—three ships in total over this two week period. The ships sitting in the harbour punctuate the non-human landscape and bring about an exciting (and exhausting!) shift in pace for the 24-48 hours they are here. The crews from Heritage...

Steve Wagstaff
9 Jan 2011 - 20:43
Research Areas
Terrestrial Ecology
Dwarf Dracophyllum Forests
D. Longifolium Growth Habit
D. Longifolium Flowers
D. Scoparium Growth Habit
D. Scoparium Flowers

With nearly 50 species, New Zealand is the centre of diversity for the genus Dracophyllum. Dracophyllum longifolium ranges widely on the mainland of New Zealand, but is also found on Stewart, Auckland and Campbell Islands, whereas D. scoparium has a perplexing distribution being found both on the Chatham Islands and Campbell Island, but not on the mainland.

At low elevations on Campbell Island they form almost impenetrable dwarf forests, which can reach up to 5 meters high, but...

Shelley McMurtrie
8 Jan 2011 - 21:22
Candid Moments
Freshwater Ecology
Hooker Valley
Time For A Rest
Mrs. MacGyver
Water Sampling
Ready To Head Back To Base
Mt Faye Saddle
Grateful For Waders
Getting Closer To Base
Time To Rest

After a four-day trip away to the northern extremes of the island we were on our way home again. We had traversed and sampled a part of the island seldom visited by people – Hooker Stream that runs through the Hooker Valley. With the local name of ‘starvation valley’ I guess it is no surprise that not many people decide to frequent this part of the island (or return if they do), but I was thoroughly chuffed we made the effort.

On the final trek home with a pack...

Colin Meurk
8 Jan 2011 - 21:12
Candid Moments
CIBE Team
Standard And Peg
Quadrat 'E'
Quadrat 'E'
Quadrat 'E'
Golden Light
The Mood Gathers

My heart is nailed to Campbell Island
like the aluminium pegs pushed in peat 40 years past
to mark plots with unknown futures
but with some secret aspiration to monitor vegetation change
forever -
attributed to sheep forgotten by shepherds half a century before

And here i am again
trying to locate these spots, being covered over by peat and plants
with fading memories and sepia pics
with fading muscles on spongy puds –...

Alex James
8 Jan 2011 - 21:01
Research Areas
Freshwater Ecology
Hooker Valley
Sorensen Hut
Inside Sorensen Hut
Hooker Stream Measurements
Hooker Stream Waterfall
Hooker Valley Slip
Feeding Time
Hooker Stream

The freshwater team has just returned from a sampling trip to the Hooker Valley (a.k.a. Starvation Valley) in the far north of Campbell Island. It was known as Starvation Valley in the past because its steep sides meant that once you were in the valley bottom, it would be difficult to get back out. Here we spent three nights in Sorensen Hut (a.k.a. Bull Rock Hut) while sampling four sites along the length of Hooker Stream.

The Hooker Valley is relatively flat bottomed with a steep...

Carla Meurk
8 Jan 2011 - 20:50
Island Life
Human Interactions
Almost Scrapbooking
Christmas Decorations
Cup Holder
Washers For Cooking
Re-creating Photopoints

As we near the expedition’s halfway mark I have been thinking about the ways in which each team member expresses his or her creativity. Photography is a passion for many members, especially Shelley who has brought with her an impressive assemblage of photographic equipment in order to capture the island’s environment and aesthetics. The obligatory cooking tasks we share have been appropriated as an opportunity to showcase our culinary flare—a particularly fine art given...

Mark Crompton
8 Jan 2011 - 20:38
Outputs
Taking Measurements
Beeman Base Map

One of my projects has been to make an accurate and definitive record of the Meteorological Station and its ancillary facilities (the station was closed 15 years ago in 1995) before the buildings deteriorate further or are removed altogether (already the Ionosonde Building, Magnetic Building, Fluxgate Magnetometer Hut and Seismo Hut have been dismantled and the Hydrogen Shed and Aurora House are next on the list).

The station forms a small but significant part of our history and...

Alex Fergus
8 Jan 2011 - 20:32
Island Life
I'm Not Alone
Turning To Leave
The Drop Down
The Kickoff
The First Beat
The Uplift
The Soar

Hi there folks, just a short one today, more of a photo blog.

As I was coming across the lower slopes of Menhir a whirr beat down above me as a Southern Royal Albatross landed somewhere immediately behind me. Let’s call him (or her) Roy for the sake of ease. Roy had not noticed me from above as I had been photographing some dwarf of a plant under the Dracophyllum scrub. As I got up with the sound of the landing, Roy did a double take, turned and took off out of there. Camera...

Shelley McMurtrie
3 Jan 2011 - 20:20
Island Life
Temporary Fix Up
Replacing Window
Broken Glass

2011 was rung in with a bang here on Cambell Island – literally. Mark Crompton and Alex Fergus were up very early on the 2nd of January (e.g., 1am) seeing in Alex’s birthday when they noticed the windows in the MetService lounge were flexing rather alarmingly. The next minute one of the windows crashed in, with glass going everywhere and the wind and rain battering into the room. A quick response from these two lads so early in the morning was quite commendable.

They...

Carla Meurk
3 Jan 2011 - 19:47
Research Areas
Human Interactions
Sea Lion Steward
Albatross Nest On Track
Track Through Draco
Track Monitoring
Hoiho Standing Guard

The altercation with the Sea Lion described in my previous blog prompted my reflection upon how the environment mediates human social relationships. It also disrupted our plans. Leaving the veg plots for a day we encountered this creature en-route to one of the islands’ peaks, Mt Paris, where we planned to retake photographs of the landscape pictured in 1907 by the Philosophical Institute of Canterbury. Focused, as we were, on getting around this Bull we mistook a Sea Lion track for...

Alex James
2 Jan 2011 - 20:36
Candid Moments
Sandy Bay Skua
Sandy Bay Sea Lions

The other day I was contemplating that since landing all our gear and settling into the base I have had no worries about anything being stolen. Back on the mainland l always make sure the door is locked and the alarm is set which I guess is testament to most peoples constant vigilance about protecting their possessions. Here on Campbell Island there are no locked doors and stuff, while getting misplaced sometimes, never gets stolen. I guess this is partly due to the expedition consisting...

Mark Crompton
2 Jan 2011 - 20:30
Candid Moments
Leslie Clifton Memorial
Leslie Clifton Memorial

I have cleared encroaching vegetation from the memorial to Leslie Clifton close to the former Magnetic Hut. Clifton produced the first topographical map of Campbell Island in 1946 – it was the standard reference for 40 years until the Department of Lands and Survey published the modern map in 1986 based on aerial photography by the RNZAF in 1984. Clifton worked in very difficult conditions without the aid of modern equipment and instruments today’s cartographers take for...

Alex Fergus
2 Jan 2011 - 20:23
Island Life
Two Hoihos

Tramping back from Penguin Bay toward North West Bay hut we stumbled across these two hidden quietly amidst the shield fern and Dracophyllum. As it turns out the juvenile Hoiho (Yellow-Eyed Penguin) has a faint blue-grey eye, changing to the characteristic yellow as the bird matures. Natures wonders’ eh? There’s probably a very good reason for this, but I’ll leave it to the universe and it mysteries for now.

[Alex Fergus]

Colin Meurk
2 Jan 2011 - 20:15
Candid Moments
CIBE Team
Panorama From Mt Paris
Hook Keys
Folly Island

Campbell Island is really an archipelago of little dots in the ocean. On a larger scale it is part of the NZ bioregion’s subantarctic island domain comprising the Bounty’s, Antipodes, Snares, Aucklands, Campbell and Macquarie Islands (the last is a territory of Australia). Many of the islands are highly significant as refuges and as geographic limits, and for the memories they bring back to me.

In December 1980 ecologist Martin Foggo and I were dropped by helicopter...

Steve Wagstaff
2 Jan 2011 - 20:01
Research Areas
Terrestrial Ecology
Cushion Plant Panorama
A Tight Cushion
A Close Association
Oreobolus

Most plants perished from Antarctica as global temperatures cooled and the ice sheets advanced. Cushion plants and mosses were among the last plants to perish. Although the precise stratigraphical sequence and dates are controversial, fossil remains suggest that they may have persisted until the Pliocene Epoch about ten million years ago.

Cushion plants form expansive communities on Campbell Island. It is conceivable these plants are the descendants of Antarctic tundra vegetation....

Mark Crompton
1 Jan 2011 - 20:45
Candid Moments
Handwritten Note By Alma Mosley

When I arrived at Campbell Island with the Bicentennial Expedition on the 8th of December 2010 I went up to the Met. Office in the Tech. Building to assist Wayne Lowry from MetService with the AWS (Automatic Weather Station) calibrations. On the wall of the office is the following note written in flowing script with a fountain pen.

‘In remembrance of my dear brother, Ralston Hawea Thomson, who worked on Campbell Island as a Shepherd with three other men. I was twelve years...

Colin Meurk
1 Jan 2011 - 20:31
Island Life
CIBE Team

The Island is small but it expands according to the difficulty of walking in the soft pillows of peat, moss and swamp. And there is so much packed into such a small space, and its ever-changing moods make Campbell Island such an intense and rich experience. Although movement around the island requires a high level of fitness many of the island’s plants and animals that contribute to its magic are readily accessible. This was most apparent yesterday as we sat on the jetty with...

Carla Meurk
1 Jan 2011 - 20:20
Island Life
Human Interactions
1984 Fence Line
Veg Meurk 84
Fieldwork Posture
Sticta Colinii
Southernmost Vegetation Plot
Dad And Sea Lion

On this trip I play dual role of field assistant and researcher. During the time I am assisting with fieldwork I am also observing and documenting scientists’ fieldwork practices. This participant observation constitutes one aspect of my data collection on scientists’ engagements with this environment. During the past week I have assisted expedition team leader (and father) Colin Meurk resurvey a series of vegetation plots that he began monitoring in 1984 when sheep were...

Steve Wagstaff
1 Jan 2011 - 20:11
Research Areas
Terrestrial Ecology
Indigenous And Naturalized Plants
Cerastium Fontanum
Anthoxanthum Odoratum
Taraxacum Officinale

A number of exotic plants have become established and persist on Campbell Island. They are mostly associated with homestead or campsites or along tracks. The most common are range grasses such as Poa pratensis, Kentucky bluegrass, Festuca rubra, red fescue, or Anthoxxanthum odoratum, sweet vernal grass. A few such as Cerastium fontanum are found in coastal habitats at the high tide line or tussock or megaherb communites. They are mostly perennial herbs or grasses with seeds or fruits that...

Alex James
31 Dec 2010 - 21:55
Island Life
Skua And Lens
Skua And Kicknet Cover
Skua Cafe

On the final day of 2010 we found ourselves working in Norton Stream which has the distinction of reaching the sea at the only significant stretch of sandy beach on Campbell Island (cleverly known as Sandy Bay). According to some of the expedition members who have extensive experience of the island, in this bay one would once encounter over 100 sea lions in a relatively small area and have to run a gauntlet of mock charges to get along the beach. However, it would now appear not so many...

Alex Fergus
31 Dec 2010 - 20:43
Candid Moments
Penguin Bay Hilton
Penguin Bay Hilton Sign
Penguin Bay Hilton Masterchef

Canadians are a fine good bunch, and ingenious to boot, a character trait most kiwis can approve of. Canadians also have a rich cultural heritage. It should have been no surprise to me then that my Canadian host at the Penguin Bay Hilton had started to create his own versions of the staple foods of New Zealand back country huts. Two of these achievements in particular come to mind. In the cold and clag one afternoon down at the Rockhopper Penguin colony, my spirits were a little revived to...

Alex Fergus
30 Dec 2010 - 20:47
Island Life
Leopard Seal

Here is a nasty piece of work, not that I want to demonise Leopard Seals or anything, but they are worth being weary of. Carla and I stumbled over this fellow after returning from Camp Cove around the coast toward Tucker Cove. Leopard Seals are not common on Campbell Island, with only a handful likely to be seen in a given year. Those that come ashore are often injured, and take up on the island to convalesce. Leopards are pretty aggressive; they feed on other seals and birds, their...

Alex Fergus
30 Dec 2010 - 20:40
Candid Moments
Penguin Stream Waterfall

Just a quick note today to point out a funny little wonder. At the cliff edge – between the summits of Yvon Villarceau Peak and Mount Paris – Penguin Stream flows out and over the cliff edge, to crash below, reform as a stream, and flow through the Yvon Villarceau Penguin colony. All of these topographical elements are features of the West Coast of Campbell Island, and as such, they are subject to some ferocious winds. The result is that most of the Penguin Stream waterfall is...

Shelley McMurtrie
28 Dec 2010 - 21:21
Island Life
Bomb Shed
Bomb Shed Sea Lion
Bomb Shed Sea Lion Lunge
Bomb Shed Sea Lion Chase
Inside The Bomb Shed
Inside The Bomb Shed

Alex James and I had a substantial day in the field yesterday (12.5 hour day) sampling Garden Stream, so today was a day at base camp to recover and get ready for a four-day field trip to Norwest Bay tomorrow. I made the most of our packing day and slept in – refusing to get out of bed until 9am. I got up for breakfast to discover I had to wear sunglasses in the lounge with the sun streaming through the windows and pushing the mercury up to a respectably balmy 19 degrees. Almost...

Alex Fergus
28 Dec 2010 - 20:07
Candid Moments
Mountain Daisy

The 28th of December! My dear wee sisters 26th birthday, so here I am sending flowers, or at least a picture of one. This is the smallest of the megaherbs (macroforbs), Damnamenia vernicosa. Latin is always a mouthful, but this little guy has no common name, so for the sake of the audience let’s dub it the Subantarctic Mountain Daisy. Usually these have a disk floret (centre) that is deep purple, but I have stumbled across this white anomaly, a rare treasure, and a wonderful present...

Carla Meurk
27 Dec 2010 - 20:01
Research Areas
Human Interactions
Cool Lichen Number 1
Cool Lichen Number 2
Cool Lichen Number 3
Such Amazing Textures
The Coral One
Cover Girl
Jigsaw Puzzle

What do Lichens have to do with people? This was a question I puzzled over as I attempted to write a blog that would allow me to showcase photographs of cool Lichens taken while momentarily sidetracked from my focus on the study of humans. The first lichen I noticed I thought looked like coral—my developing appreciation of lichens trailing my enjoyment of diving. I guess one can only group a new thing in relation with the kinds of things one already knows about.

As I...

Colin Meurk
26 Dec 2010 - 21:36
Research Areas
Terrestrial Ecology
Expedition Dwellings - 1971
Expedition Dwellings - 2010
Happy Elephant Seals

One of the simplest and most effective ways of visualising and evaluating change in vegetation is to go back to where historic photos were taken and take the exact same shot. It is amazing to see history happen in front of your eyes. We are fortunate in having many old photographs taken around Campbell Island going back as far as the 1880s – before there was much human-caused change in the vegetation. This is a bit of a base line.

As an example (I will provide some better...

Alex James
26 Dec 2010 - 21:26
Island Life
Grey With A Hint Of Blue

Having been marooned on Campbell Island for three weeks now over early summer I feel I have a small amount of authority to discuss the weather. The weather here moves by with great speed so you can have a bit of everything over a day. Generally however, conditions could be best described as delightfully dull grey with periodic drizzle and a hint of blue-sky on the horizon that promises but rarely delivers any actual sun. The temperature outside regularly reaches lofty peaks of maybe 10...

Steve Wagstaff
26 Dec 2010 - 21:21
Research Areas
Terrestrial Ecology
Panoramic View
Abrotanella Rostrata
Abrotanella Spathulata

It is widely accepted that sympatric speciation occurs, but it has rarely been demonstrated and the process is not well understood; allopatric speciation (reproductive isolation by distance) being a more common mode of evolution. Island ecosystems provide a perfect venue to test these evolutionary phenomena.

Two species of Abrotanella are found on Campbell Island. Abrotanella spathulata is the more...

Steve Croasdale
26 Dec 2010 - 20:41
Island Life
Technical Assistance
Beeman Point Base
Taking A Break

I first came to Campbell Island in 1989 for a recce, then several more times over the last 20 years. I was then supporting the meteorological programme by maintaining the essential services at the Beeman base (photo). For the Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition (CIBE) my role has been similar. We are occupying a still very sound building, first established in the 1950s, developed, but abandoned as a full time occupied meteorological office in 1995 when an automatic weather station was...

Alex Fergus
26 Dec 2010 - 20:38
Research Areas
Terrestrial Ecology
Penguin Bay, 2005
Rockhopper Pengiuns

Well not wrangle the Rockhopper's, but I am off to monitor chick survival. It’s been 6 years since I was at Penguin Bay, and the photos here date from then. In that short time it’s likely the population of Pengs has continued to decline, an ongoing trend since the 1940s.

I’m heading over to the Bay, about a 6 hour tramp across the heart of Campbell Island, to help out Kyle Morrison, a Canadian PhD student studying Rockhopper Penguin decline as part of a NIWA...

Steve Wagstaff
26 Dec 2010 - 20:28
Research Areas
Terrestrial Ecology
Panoramic View
Lush Megaherb Community
Polystichum Cysostegia
Mark Filming

On Dec 24 Mark Crompton and I set out on a botanical expedition to the saddle between Mt Azimuth and Mt Fizeau. These two peaks roughly bisect Campbell Island and offer outstanding views to the north and south. As the albatross glides it is only about three kilometres to the saddle, but the track winds through dwarf Dracophyllum forest, boggy tussocks, megaherbs and alpine tundra fellfields near the saddle.

Mark is a fine companion; I’d trust him with my life. He walks at a...

Mark Crompton
25 Dec 2010 - 20:45
Island Life
CIBE Team
Christmas Dessert
Mountford Wine - Christmas Selection
Christmas Cake

It’s Christmas Night 2010 and the Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition has been here for nearly three weeks. Carla Meurk and Alex Fergus put on a fine Christmas Dinner and as is traditional we all ate too much. Between the main course and dessert our Leader, Colin Meurk, put on a treasure hunt and it struck a distant chord from childhood birthday parties over 50 years ago.

After dinner I walked around to the old Coastwatcher’s Camp in Tucker Cove and it suddenly...

Alex James
25 Dec 2010 - 20:35
Island Life
CIBE Team
Christmas Choir
Rain Chases Everyone Away

Christmas morning on Campbell Island was a little different to past Christmases on the mainland I have experienced. It started relatively normally with a tasty pancake breakfast, but since it was a Saturday, our scheduled base cleaning day, after breakfast I was cleaning toilets. While there is nothing particularly difficult about cleaning toilets, it is probably not something most people would usually undertake on Christmas morning.

Once the base was spick and span, we then had to...

Shelley McMurtrie
24 Dec 2010 - 19:59
Research Areas
Freshwater Ecology
Sticky Trap
Traps Set
Jo In The Undergrowth
Cost In The Draco
Tucker Stream
Sticky Trap

Jo (our DOC rep) was back from helping out two phd students on the island with us, so Alex James and I invited her along when we put out the sticky and pitfall traps along Tucker Stream, to show her what stream ecologists get up to – when we are not sampling in streams that is.

With the thick Dracophyllum, we were crawling through the undergrowth to get to 20m out from the stream to set up our traps (at 0m, 10m and 20m from the stream); in such situations it's always good...

Colin Meurk
23 Dec 2010 - 21:35
Research Areas
Terrestrial Ecology
Mapping A Quadrat In 2010
Map Of Original 1970 Fence Line Quadrat
2010 Map Of 1970 Fence Line Quadrat
Quadrat 13
Quadrat 14
Sampling In Fog And Wind

What am I doing down here – 41 years since I first set foot on Campbell Island? I originally came down as a callow youth to set up a vegetation monitoring programme for recording the way plants responded to the eradication of sheep. This was carried out progressively between 1970 (northern part of Island), 1984 (all but southeastern tip of Island) and early 1990s when the last one was removed.

We are going back to check all those plots, transect lines and photo points (...

Carla Meurk
23 Dec 2010 - 21:22
Research Areas
Technical Assistance
The Colony
Orange 32
A Banded Bird
Orange 83
The Colony

The island’s Albatross species have been key players in the history of ecology in the region with a banding program established during World War II by Jack Sorensen, a naturalist stationed on the island as a coastwatcher. Over the ensuing years MetService staff, scientists and most recently international volunteers have continued this (and other) ornithological research.

I recently spent 6 days assisting current Albatross research during which time I learnt how to handle...

Alex James
23 Dec 2010 - 20:31
Candid Moments
Albatross Party

On the mainland Christmas often seems to sneak up on you but unless you are a hermit that shuns the media, you always know it is coming by all the advertising that starts as a trickle in November and becomes a torrent in December.

This year I have found myself in the novel situation of being away from all forms of media since December 3rd. Thus I have not watched television, listened to the radio, read the newspaper, or surfed the Internet during the period of Christmas overload....

Colin Meurk
23 Dec 2010 - 20:10
Island Life
CIBE Team
Perseverance Harbour
Perseverance Harbour
Glimpse of I’le Dent
Koromiko and Onion Plant
Button Daisy
Aniseed-Smelling Carrot
Sea Lion on Front Lawn
Pipits
Feeding Time
Perseverance Harbour
Tucker Cove

One of the many memorable and distinctive aspects of our daily interactions with and experiences of Campbell Island is the ever shifting patterns of light, colour, shade, dark, gloom and even (!) dismal conditions.

The sun and wind continually play moody tunes on the sea, wildlife, plants and our very existence on the Island. It is not exactly subsistence; but there is deprivation – ambient inside temperatures are around...

Alex Fergus
22 Dec 2010 - 21:16
Research Areas
Terrestrial Ecology
Rennell Expt. 1960
Rennell Expt. 2010

Rats like to gobble creepy crawly things (insects). But which ones do they like to gobble the most? And of those favourites, have any endured down here on Campbell Island? It’s now almost a decade since the furry devils were eradicated from the island, so no longer are things like the giant weevils and the local weta subject to regular chompings.

This series of nets is a replica of an experiment run in 1960; by comparing records from then to now I can see which insects have...

Shelley McMurtrie
22 Dec 2010 - 20:54
Island Life
CIBE Team
Beeman Base
Beeman Base
Cloud Formations

The NZ book titled ‘a river rules my life’ comes to mind down here on Campbell Island. Not because we are sampling streams, but because of the similarity to how our lives are completely ruled by a single factor - the weather.

Days can progress either along the forecasted weather route (thanks Mark) or can deviate remarkably, although in our meteorologist's sage words (that's Mark), he is rarely wrong... What ever happened to that snow fall you predicted?

...
Steve Wagstaff
22 Dec 2010 - 20:28
Island Life
CIBE Team
Perseverance Harbour
Alex Fergus
Veronica elliptica
Damnamenia Vernicosa
Chiloglottis cornuta
Lyperanthus antarcticus

It is challenging to move about and work on Campbell Island. The lower slopes are covering with dense dwarf forest and chest high tussocks. The ground is soggy and uneven and a mislaid step can easily wake a napping sea lion. Most of the time they are only mildly annoyed, but some of the young males have a chip on their shoulder and can be aggressive. They’re large animals, with two inch yellow incisors, and they drool. It takes nerve to stand your ground when they come loping at you...

Shelley McMurtrie
20 Dec 2010 - 22:50
Research Areas
Freshwater Ecology
Camp Stream Waterfall
Camp Stream Patterns

With some favourable weather on the forecast we travelled a bit further afield (but not too far) over to Camp Cove and up Camp Stream. On our way were many sea lion encounters – they seem invariably intrigued in these two neoprene-clad bipeds that like to hang out in the streams like they do. We clearly are not that interesting however, as after a few minutes of sniffing they are off again to do their own thing.

We found Camp Stream to be a delightful tannin-stained waterway...

Colin Meurk
18 Dec 2010 - 21:38
Island Life
Terrestrial Ecology
My Honey
Dracophyllym Trees
Dwarf Forest Navigation
Weeping Mapou
Weeping Mapou
Lovely Bubbling Stream
Hymenophyllum Minimum
Spider Orchid
Spider Orchid

The Sitka Spruce planted in Camp Cove by Lord Ranfurly early last century has been erroneously reported as the southernmost tree in New Zealand. Of course trees go further south in Patagonia, but there are trees here already – it’s all a matter of definition.

Trees have been described as woody plants with a single trunk and canopy of foliage, a woody plant over 5 m tall and other height limits. The native heath trees on Campbell Island (2 species of Dracophyllum or...

Steve Wagstaff
18 Dec 2010 - 20:24
Island Life
CIBE Team
Perseverance Harbour
Orientation Walk
Megaherb Communities
Damnamenia Vernicosa
Leptinella Plumosa

The CIBE members live in the MetService Annex building which overlooks Perseverance Harbour. The Annex is quite comfortable, the inside temperature ranges a bit above ambient; chilly when its clagged in and slimy outside, but our main living room is oriented to capture the sun on fine days.

Meals have been feats of culinary masterpiece complimented by a selection of fine wines donated by our sponsor Mountford Estate. One would have thought, fish pie, chicken curry, brownies and...

Shelley McMurtrie
16 Dec 2010 - 21:02
Island Life
Yawning
Yawning
Dozing

Campbell Island is a place full of surprises. Today she was in a beatific mood and the wildlife seemed to be in the same mindset - the sun was shining, the day warm (hot by Campbell Island standards), and barely a breath of wind gusted. Steve Croasdale and I made the most of the calm water and launched his inflatable dingy and rowed (Steve did) around to Tucker Cove with the ContourHD in the water.

The local sea lions were most interested in this new play-thing and one spent over...

Colin Meurk
16 Dec 2010 - 20:55
Research Areas
Terrestrial EcologyFreshwater Ecology
Gressit Experiment
Disgruntled Sea Lion
Honey Falls Stream - Sampling Site
Back Off
Scrubbing Rocks

Campbell Island is not really the place for fishnet stockings but nets are in this season. We know there are nets out across the oceans, possibly harming the fish stocks that the penguins and albatrosses dine out on. But here on the Bicentennial Expedition to Campbell there are smaller fish to fry – and some bigger!

The next thing I saw these heroic freshwater biologists doing was scrubbing the rocks for algae-inhabiting insects and crustaceans and then measuring the rocks;...

Alex Fergus
16 Dec 2010 - 19:45
Island Life
CIBE Team
A Hasty Retreat
Our Barricade
Too Terrified To Eat
Assertion Of Dominance
North West Bay Hut

Carla’s human impacts monitoring saw us advancing under glorious sunshine to North West Bay. We clambered up from the Capstan Cove beach, through the goblin forest of Dracophyllum (turpentine scrub), and were met with a bark. As Carla puts it, a young female sea lion took exception to our presence — conceivable, given she did her best to hurry us into the little A-frame hut she was defending. I am more of the view that this young lioness was a lone hut warden, embracing,...

Alex James
15 Dec 2010 - 21:35
Research Areas
Freshwater Ecology
Honey Falls
Surber Sampling
Kick Net Sampling
Chironomid Homes
Which Way
Honey Falls Stream - Upstream Site
Net Deployed
Tiama's Inflatable
Honey Falls Stream Valley
Heading Home

On December 14th the tourist boat ‘Tiama’ sailed into Perseverance Harbour and set anchor. As this boat has a small inflatable with outboard, we were presented with the opportunity to visit a nearby, but difficult to access (by foot) stream on the opposite side of the harbour. The skipper, Henk, kindly agreed to collect us from the wharf on the morning of the 15th, drop us off at the stream mouth, and collect us late in the afternoon. Also joining Shelley and I was botanist...

Alex James
14 Dec 2010 - 20:35
Research Areas
Freshwater Ecology
Tucker Stream
Tucker Stream - Site 1
Coastwatchers Hut
Coastwatchers Hut Leftovers
Tucker Stream - Site 2
Tucker Stream - Site 2 Loggers
Tucker Stream - Site 2
Walking Upstream
Tucker Stream - Site 3

Following a couple of days of very cold and windy weather the freshwater team got their field program underway. This initially involves concentrating on the nearby streams that can be done as day trips from the base. Later we will move on to the logistically challenging streams further away from base.

On Tuesday (Dec 14th) we started off with a trip to Tucker Stream, the mouth of which is only 20 minutes walk from base. This stream’s valley is of historic interest (as well...

Carla Meurk
10 Dec 2010 - 21:45
Island Life
A nest For Two
An Affectionate Peck
A Return Peck
Playing Footsie
The Striking Couple

The ridges on Campbell offer some extraordinary views of expansive megaherb fields that end abruptly at the dramatic cliffs punctuating the coastline. Strong and icy winds whip across these exposed areas and hypothermia is a real risk. I am thankful for my wind and rainproof clothing and the ample supply of chocolate we have with us (thanks Swazi, Aspiring and...

Shelley McMurtrie
10 Dec 2010 - 20:50
Island Life
CIBE Team
HMNZS Otago in Perseverance
Offloading from the Wellington
Clearing the lower winch track
Clearing the upper winch track
The locals looking on
The trolley winch
Quarantine time

I am sitting here in relative luxury in the MetService Hostel on Campbell Island, with a light on, the computer going, and the dulcet tones of Fat Freddys Drop playing – all thanks to the wiring genius of Steve Croasdale and Wayne (MetService chaps) plus our cute wee generator. The base is cold though with no heating - not too much difference between inside and outside temps (burr).

We arrived at Campbell Island two days ago with snow on the hills and it continued to snow off...

Alex Fergus
10 Dec 2010 - 19:45
Island Life
CIBE Team

3 days of unpacking and prepping has been followed by 32 hours on a rolling ocean (up to sea-state 5 in navy speak). The seventy five percent of the team that remained bedridden at sea have risen, and spirits are high. Sleet has given way to snow to sun to wind to rain and now it’s calm on our 3rd evening. Until now our exploration of the island's biotic bustle has been limited, but come nightfall each evening a few of us have had the chance to start exploring the boardwalk...

Carla Meurk
10 Dec 2010 - 14:25
Research Areas
Human Interactions

Campbell Island, a small dot located in the furious fifties, is of immense importance to professional scientists and amateur naturalists alike. These intrepid present day voyagers brave rough seas and a hostile climate to experience the unique flora and fauna. Over the next nine weeks I’ll be studying the people who visit this remote location to answer questions about how they relate to the social and natural environment that surrounds them. In addition to my study of others, this...

Shelley McMurtrie
9 Dec 2010 - 10:25
CIBE Team
Checking the manifest
HMNZS Wellington in Bluff
Bridge of the Wellington
Home on the Wellington
Stern of the Wellington
Departing the Wellington
A calm southern ocean

It is a funny thing but the one topic of conversation on a ship heading to the Subantarctics isn’t about the splendor of your destination but about whether or not you will be bringing up your lunch on the way down. Thanks to a work Christmas function on my last night in Christchurch I had plenty of gory seasick disaster stories (thanks Dave!) vying for attention in my mind to keep my immediate future ripe with technicolour possibilities…

Of course in usual style we...

Mark Crompton
8 Dec 2010 - 20:35

We sailed from Bluff at 21.30 NZDT on Monday 06 December 2010 aboard the HMNZS Wellington. The Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition was underway after a gestation period of nearly five years. As we entered Foveaux Strait I retired to my bunk where I remained for the entire voyage apart from one brief foray up to the bridge. My impression of the Southern Ocean was that there is a lot of it.

The forbidding coast of Campbell Island was sighted at first light on Wednesday 08...

Alex James
8 Dec 2010 - 13:30

After a busy morning of loading all and sundry onto the HMNZS Wellington we finally left Bluff Harbour at 8 p.m. on Monday December 6th, heading into relatively calm seas. Armed with both Sealegs tablets and ‘natural’ ginger anti-nausea pills I was hopeful although a little apprehensive on my sea sickness potential.

Over that night from the tight confines of my allocated bunk of adequate length but miniscule headroom I could feel the seas becoming angry. I kept taking...

Shelley McMurtrie
6 Dec 2010 - 14:30
CIBE Team
CIBE Quarantine
CIBE Quarantine
CIBE Quarantine
CIBE Quarantine
CIBE Quarantine
CIBE Quarantine
CIBE Quarantine
CIBE Quarantine

It's 3pm on Monday (6th Dec) and in around five hours we will be on the HMNZS Wellington making our way to Campbell Island. Just enough time then to get some photos loaded and write a quick blog! Sorry but I didn't manage to get a video clip together (gave up editing around 11pm last night).

So lets backtrack to last Friday...

Alex James, Mark Crompton, and I flew down to Invercargill on Friday (3rd Dec) while Colin and co. had driven down the previous day....

Shelley McMurtrie
3 Dec 2010 - 14:35
CIBE Team
BGAN satellite phone
Packing the van
Loading the generator
Shelley's modelling career
Another load for the trailer
More stuff for the trailer
Waving goodbye

Wednesday dawned and the calmness of the day was broken by the sound of packing tape and the click of the camera shutter. The big packup day had arrived and we looked at the van and small trailer and wished we had ordered up the Tardis instead. But the 'Tetris' packing skills of team EOS were impressive as boxes were crammed into the smallest spaces. It should be said that Colin and I managed to get out of some of the packing when we were interviewed by The Press' environmental...

Shelley McMurtrie
30 Nov 2010 - 15:30
Packing the gear
Michelle labelling
Alex J labelling
More labelling
Packing pottles

The team at EOS Ecology spent another day packing up the gear for the Campbell Island expedition. Under a sea of pottles, tape, and boxes they did a fantastic job cleaning, packing, and labelling everyone's gear. Thanks guys - a stellar effort considering most of you aren't even going to the island! We all appreciate your hard work and on-going support of this project!

[Shelley McMurtrie]

Shelley McMurtrie
26 Nov 2010 - 15:25
CIBE Generator
CIBE Generator
Michelle - our volunteer
CIBE Food
First Aid Kits
Taping up boxes
Coffee and equipment
BGan Explorer 700

Well it has been a while since my last blog but I have a decent excuse - with the expedition mere days away I have been tied up getting all the gear ready. You would not want to see the lounge right now - camera and video gear all over the place! The staff at EOS Ecology (our largest corporate sponsor) have been a life saver, with many of the team helping get all the food and general supplies together for the 9 week expedition. Erron Henderson (the Manager) has taken over as the 'go-to...

Alex Fergus
9 Nov 2010 - 19:30
Media Feeds
Campbell Island Megaherb

I'll be giving a talk on the 23rd of November as part of the Our Oceans Lecture Series run by the Otago Museum. My talk will focus on the natural and human history of Campbell Island. It starts at 6:30 pm in the Barclay Theatre - more details can be found here:

www.otagomuseum.govt.nz/community_programmes.html

This is a free event and it would be great to see a good...

Shelley McMurtrie
6 Nov 2010 - 19:05
Candid Moments
Ella's Picture
Jamie's Picture
The Three Kids

I got a lovely letter in the post from my sister who lives in London with her husband and three kids. It was about how her two eldest kids—Ella and Jamie—have been looking at what their Aunty will be up to on Campbell Island, with pictures that they had drawn for me. I have posted the pictures and part of the letter here, as I think that they are just lovely.

Thanks Ella and Jamie and big hugs to you both, as well as Mia (and of course your mum and dad!).

...

Shelley McMurtrie
6 Nov 2010 - 17:15
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Recipe time
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Recipe time
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Recipe time
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Recipe time
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Recipe time
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Recipe time
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Recipe time
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Recipe time

With a 9 week expedition on a remote island with no power and no supermarket to pop into (closest on being 700km away!), finding food that will last but taste nice and be nutritional seemed like a tall order. So Chef consultant Suzanne Henderson came to the rescue to sort out our food order and develop some specialised menus with an eye for nutrition and quick/easy cooking (something that any of us could cook up on the gas hob and diesel oven). I think if Suz knew how much work was...

Shelley McMurtrie
6 Nov 2010 - 09:59
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Swazi tryout
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Swazi tryout
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Swazi tryout

Two boxes of goodies turned up the other day so there was excitement all around when we opened them up to check out the range. The Swazi guys had sent us different sizes of the jackets and tops they are giving us as well as a range of other items that they thought we would find useful. Time for a fashion show!  We will try these on to get the final sizing back to Swazi for our freebies and an order for any other gear at cost price.

In fact I have got their tops on now and...

Shelley McMurtrie
30 Oct 2010 - 15:54
Media Feeds

We have had our first radio interview with Graeme Hill at Radio Live today. Expedition leader Colin Meurk had a good talk with Graeme about the Subantartics and what we are planning to do on our 9 week sojourn. 



If you missed it live you can check out the pod cast on the Radio Live web site.

We will have another interview before we sail and then link up...

Shelley McMurtrie
30 Oct 2010 - 13:24

As we get ever closer to our departure date things are starting to ramp up (or possibly unravel!) in the organisation and logistics department.  With so much equipment to organise and media output agreements to finalise I was delighted to get a call from a Michelle Beritzhoff with the offer of a helping hand. Michelle is a recent MSc graduate (marine, Otago University) who is now in Christchurch and has offered to help us any way she can with our preparation. I am sure that we will...

Shelley McMurtrie
29 Oct 2010 - 19:41
50 Degrees South Trust - Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition
50 Degrees South Trust - Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition

A trip to Wellington's national museum, Te Papa, for the EIANZ conference gave me the perfect opportunity to catch up with some people for the Campbell Island expedition....

Given this perfect conference location I managed to catch up with the team at Te Papa about a possible one-year exhibition there in 2012, and to make sure that any specimens we are bringing back will be good to use in this as well. Lots of exciting talks were had and even looked into options...

Shelley McMurtrie
16 Oct 2010 - 11:18
Media Feeds

We have had our first news article, in the Southland Times (by Rosemarie Smith). Written from the perspective of a gardener, it is a great account of the "most spectacular natural garden in the world". Check out the article here.

[Shelley McMurtrie]

Shelley McMurtrie
5 Oct 2010 - 22:25
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - September fundraiser
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - September fundraiser
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - September fundraiser
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - September fundraiser
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - September fundraiser
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - September fundraiser
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - September fundraiser
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - September fundraiser
50 Degrees South Trust

The evening of the 24th September couldn’t have been better if you had ordered it off a menu. The clock ticked over to 5pm and one of those beautiful spring evenings unfolded, with the wind dropping to a murmur and the warm night air refreshingly sweet. The setting at Peter and Annabel’s house near Tai Tapu was picture-perfect, with Annabel's stunning sculptures and paintings off-set against the rural setting outside. We had a good bunch of helpers to keep the night running...

Shelley McMurtrie
30 Sep 2010 - 22:26
50 Degrees South Trust

Getting to Campbell Island is not as simple as jumping on a boat. The island is a World Heritage site that is protected against people running wild around the island. These meetings between the Department of Conservation and the Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition team helps us to work through our research permits and iron out the logistical details. Details, details, the devil is in the details.

[Shelley McMurtrie]

Shelley McMurtrie
10 Sep 2010 - 22:19
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Chch earthquake
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Chch earthquake
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Chch earthquake
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Chch earthquake
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Chch earthquake
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Chch earthquake
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Chch earthquake
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition - Chch earthquake

When I went to bed on Friday night (3rd September) I was thinking about the productive weekend I would have getting everything organised for the upcoming CIBE support function (planned for 11th September). Little did I know that at 4.30am I would be leaping out of bed to shelter under the bedroom doorway in pitch black and the world seemingly falling down around us. We were so lucky in that the house seemed structurally ok, but loss of power, fallen furniture, smashed items, and a massive...

Shelley McMurtrie
5 Sep 2010 - 15:57
Suzanne Henderson

After angsting over the food list for the expedition I had a passing chat with a friend (who also happens to be my partner's sister) about our woes. As a chef she was excited about the prospect of working out a healthy, high energy, low sodium menu for us. So with a sigh of relief I thankfully passed over the task of organising the food to Suzanne. Since that time she has been meeting with suppliers,  trialling products, and making and testing out full-proof recipes.

I am...

Shelley McMurtrie
31 Aug 2010 - 22:42
Invite cover

The 50º South Trust is having an invite-only support function on the evening of the 24th September 2010.

Our honoured guests and speakers are:

• The Rt Hon Kate Wilkinson (Minister of Conservation)

• Tim Shadbolt (Mayor of Invercargill; gateway to the Subantarctic)

• Diana, Lady Isaac (conservationist and philanthropist)

• Don Merton (saviour of the black robin and other NZ birds, and CIBE Patron)

• Ruud...