THE JOURNEY

Island Life

Shelley McMurtrie
29 Dec 2011 - 18:00
Island Life
CIBE Team
See video

An email from Carla about how we would celebrate Christmas and New Year away from Campbell Island got a few Christmas memories going for the CIBE team. For Mark Crompton his Campbell Island Christmas memories are:

"Songs down at the wharf, Mountford pinot, mussels fritters, vodka steeped in sweet vernal, tangos...

Shelley McMurtrie
17 Dec 2011 - 18:00
Island Life
CIBE Team
Timber under the Hostel at Beeman Base, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition
Rubbish under the Hostel at Beeman Base, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition
Steve Croasdale, flaky pastry, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition
Steve Croasdale, flaky pastry, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition
Steve Croasdale, flaky pastry, Mountford, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expeditio
Rolling pin, Campbell Island Bicentennary Expedition

Steve Croasdale was our ‘can do’ handy man on the expedition. While he didn’t pop up a lot in our island blogs he was always there working away on repairing and maintaining the base camp buildings on behalf of the Met Service.

Part of this involved clearing out the rubbish that had accumulated under the floor of the Hostel building for many years. A number of strange items came out of that pile, but among...

Alex Fergus
7 Feb 2011 - 20:45
Island Life

I feel that little niggle. That wee worry. After 9 weeks on an isolated island with a small group of people, how will I handle returning to the outside world? Will I become a bewildered hermit, unable to operate in groups larger than 10? The answer is probably yes, but it doesn’t much matter as Carla and I have hashed a plan. To ease back into society, we will use Stewart Island as a stepping stone. The rough plan is to convert the Meurk’s holiday hut into a research lab for a...

Carla Meurk
29 Jan 2011 - 20:27
Island Life
Terrestrial Ecology
Missing data

Unfortunately, in spite of our best efforts, we will leave the island without complete datasets ...

[Carla Meurk]

Carla Meurk
28 Jan 2011 - 20:21
Island Life
Human Interactions
View from Mt Honey
View from Mt Paris
Southern tip of NZ
Megaherb fields
View from Mt Paris

In this, my last blog from Campbell, I thought I’d compile a list of highlights and lowlights experienced on the Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition 2010/2011:

Lowlights:
5: Sinking knee deep in peat and being unable to pull my leg out without lying down in the mud and spreading myself out as much as I could in order to free myself and thinking ‘this must be how the Moa felt’.
4: Crawling on my hands and knees through the scratchy Draco more...

Norm Judd
27 Jan 2011 - 20:11
Island Life
CIBE TeamTechnical Assistance
Colin welcoming Norm
The Maia
Watties, what else
Mince pie time
Mince pie and wine
C4 coffee
Survival Kit Company
Broken window

This is a personal thank you to all the individuals and organisations that have made the archaeological assessment of Campbell Island’s historic sites possible. It is an all time first.

This thank you comes a little early because the expedition is not yet over but I’ve seen and experienced enough to know that the expedition would not have been possible without sponsorship, donations, and technical support and assistance.

From a personal point of view the most...

Carla Meurk
27 Jan 2011 - 20:05
Island Life
Bulbinella
Pleurophyllum
Damniminia
Gentian
Christmas colours

When we arrived I commented that I was experiencing an unusual spring; we arrived to blooming Bulbinella, vomiting Giant Petrel chicks and I spent time in an Albatross colony full of babies. (NB: For those interested, Orange 83 continues to do well).

The GP chicks are losing their down and starting to flex their wings, they will fledge soon, and the Bulbinella...

Carla Meurk
26 Jan 2011 - 21:47
Island Life
Human Interactions
Skill 6

My previous list neglected one important fieldwork capability. In the interests of completeness I thought I’d add fieldwork skill number 6: Learn to be comfortable toileting anywhere, and in any weather.

[Carla Meurk]

Carla Meurk
22 Jan 2011 - 20:43
Island Life
Human Interactions
Col-Lyall Saddle
Lyall Ridge
The Clag
Drying laundry
A shorts and t-shirt day?

Walking through a sea lion colony yesterday, Campbell’s wind thwarted my planned blogging activities. As I simultaneously counted live and dead sea lion pups, kept an eye on the Bulls (‘beach masters’) and minded my step on an exposed rocky outcrop in screaming wind, I was unable to add a fifth task of photography. Sadly, therefore, this experience of life (and death) in the subantarctic went un-pictured. I would love to have captured the cute yet devilish image of baby...

Carla Meurk
21 Jan 2011 - 20:18
Island Life
Human Interactions
Pants
Pants
Shoes
iPod
Back
Waist belt

Many ecologists (and anthropologists for that matter) describe how the love of fieldwork was an important motivator in their choice of degree and career path. For those wishing to proceed along the research trajectory nowadays a PhD is a necessary prerequisite. However, there are many fieldwork skills that your university education will not teach you. To assist the budding fieldworker, I have compiled a handy list of skills required in the field:

1.    Learn to sew,...

Carla Meurk
20 Jan 2011 - 20:53
Island Life
Human Interactions
Coring a lake

Now, I don’t like to complain ... but this past week has been more difficult than most. My energy has waned, my knees are achy and it’s been quite quite cold. My pack’s waist belt snapped and a top strap has gone as well. The deterioration of my gear, fatigue and an insatiable appetite is helping me adjust to the prospect of returning home in just over 2 weeks.

Still, I didn’t want to miss the opportunity to assist Paleolimnologist Dr Krystyna Saunders...

Colin Meurk
19 Jan 2011 - 20:42
Island Life
Anisotome latifolia
Pleurophyllum criniferum and subantarctic onion
Fogged out
Erebus Point
Prickly shield fern
Water fern
Kiokio
Gentian and lichen
Bull kelp
Pleurophyllum speciosum
Elfin woods
Coastal rocks and tussock
Millpond harbour
Remains of Tucker Camp

Light, shade, colour, texture, form and continual change make the visual experience of Campbell Island. The never-ending variety of patterns, like tapestries in and out of focus, will be among my memories of this place. It’s also been rather cold over the last couple of days - but now the wind has dropped and slanting golden rays of the setting sun are washing across the foot of Mt Honey on the other side of the harbour and we can hope for a couple of days of settled weather! As an...

Shelley McMurtrie
18 Jan 2011 - 20:08
Island Life
See video

We awoke today to our first real storm. Perseverance Harbour had been transformed from the glassy millpond the previous day to one of wild whitecaps and battering waves. For the first time during this expedition the wharf was under siege from the harbour’s waves. As Mark C (our weatherman) explained it, there was a 35 knot nor-easterly wind driving the waves into the harbour and lowering the outside temperature to 5.5ºC – the inside temperature only marginally warmer at 6...

Alex Fergus
18 Jan 2011 - 19:52
Island Life
Steve C's award
Mark's award
Alex F and Carla's award
Jo's award
Colin's award

Leaving 9 people alone on a cold, windy and wet Subantarctic island can put strain on social relations. Some voices are louder than others. Some appetites are greater than others. And some opinions are stronger than others. Such social tensions can cause small groups to split into sadistic teams of gossip mongering loathsome ghouls. Naturally with our smiling kiwi dispositions (and beaming American and Australian ones) this fate has yet to befall our team (which has swollen to 11 after the...

Shelley McMurtrie
17 Jan 2011 - 21:59
Island Life
See video

One of the main premises for our expedition is to plot the recovery of the island since the removal of sheep and the world's largest island rat eradication programme. Our work mainly concentrates on how this has benefited and changed the island’s plant and invertebrate communities, as these changes will have flow-on effects to the larger vertebrate species on the island. However, we cannot help but see for ourselves how the removal of the introduced animals has helped the smaller...

Mark Crompton
16 Jan 2011 - 21:35
Island Life
Ascending Mt Honey
Ascending Mt Honey
Mark and sea lion
Ascending Mt Honey in the snow

I have climbed Mt Honey on Campbell Island many times, the last before the Bicentennial Expedition being 19 years ago in 1991. During the term of this expedition I have repeated the ascent twice and am convinced that it has either got higher or that the Earth’s gravitational field has increased locally due to some anomalous relativistic effect. Other explanations are not being entertained.

[Mark (Swamps) Crompton]

Carla Meurk
16 Jan 2011 - 20:59
Island Life
Freshwater Ecology
Boat route
Six Foot Lake islet
Snack break
Six Foot Lake
Campbell Island Teal

With midterm resupply we’ve had the Maia at our disposal, transportation we utilised to access Six Foot Lake. Campbell’s tea-coloured lake is located on the south side of the island where it accentuates a landscape of flaxen tones; scattered animal bones, scavenging Skuas and Giant Petrels cloak the lakeshore...

Mark Crompton
15 Jan 2011 - 21:06
Island Life
Colin's Birthday Meal
Colin's Birthday Bottle of Wine
Colin's Birthday Toast
Colin's Birthday Cake
Colin's Birthday - Father and Daughter

The leader of the Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition (CIBE), Colin Meurk, is 64 today. I met Colin over 40 years ago on Campbell Island when he came down as a member of the 1970 Wildlife Expedition. We were young then and had dreams and aspirations. Some have been realised, some not – that is life. I have a birthday present for Colin and I think that here on Campbell Island is the perfect place for it to be delineated. Some of it he has already received, some is ongoing.

...
Alex Fergus
15 Jan 2011 - 21:02
Island Life
History and Archaeology
1888
1970
2011

This island of ours has a surprisingly rich and well documented European history, given how inaccessible the old girl is. Many of the previous expeditions and leisure trips have documented the island from the very early days of Subantarctic exploration. William Dougall and his Southland team were among the first folks to venture south on a photographic sojourn to Campbell...

Alex James
13 Jan 2011 - 20:38
Island Life
Freshwater Ecology
See video

My ride home, the motor sailer “Maia”, arrived on Jan 10th and has been hanging around for the last few days to ferry various expedition teams to some difficult to access locations around the island. On Jan 12th the history, terrestrial ecology, and freshwater ecology teams were taken around to Northeast Harbour for a days work.

Northeast Harbour was the location of one of the largest whaling stations on the island and at its head is the mouth of Northeast Stream, a...

Alex Fergus
10 Jan 2011 - 20:04
Island Life
Rockhopper Penguin
Rockhopper Penguin Chicken
You're Too Close
Fashion Accessory?
Nest Building Materials
Skua On The Hunt
Penguin Monitoring

It sucks to be a Rockhopper penguin! This is the great biological principle I have uncovered after hanging out with these wee fella’s for six days midway through their breeding season. Rockhoppers are the smallest of the crested penguins, the next size up in penguin styles from the little Blue penguin. Penguin styles in all run from 40 cm standing (little Blue Penguins) through to 115 cm (the Emperor Penguins). At this time of year most of the Rockhopper chickens are about three...

Alex James
9 Jan 2011 - 21:55
Island Life
Sea Lion Pup
Sea Lion
Royal Albatross
Skua Chick

Many people come to Campbell Island to experience not only the wild scenery but also the wildlife. They want to see elephant seals snorting, sea lions swimming, royal albatross gamming, penguins playing, pipits investigating, skuas stealing their gear, and teal posing for a photograph. The brochures and glossy books are filled with photos of wildlife. However seeing a photo of wilddeath is rarer than getting a photo of a snipe. By wilddeath I mean the dead and decayed bodies of the island...

Colin Meurk
9 Jan 2011 - 21:35
Island Life
CIBE Team
Campbell Island Pipit
Happy Quadrating
After The Encounter
Tooth Marks
Concerned Medical Man
A Concerned Daugther
Puncture Wounds
The Attacker

While in this World Heritage location we have to be especially careful to avoid damaging the environment and disturbing the wildlife. We endeavour to apply the 5 m rule – giving any birds or marine mammals a wide berth. Of course there is nothing in the manual about the wildlife disturbing us! For example, pipits don’t (as Pete McClelland succinctly puts it) observe the 5 m rule and frequently slow down ‘traffic’ by insisting on running along the tracks in front of...

Carla Meurk
9 Jan 2011 - 21:12
Island Life
Human Interactions
Sipping On C4
The Ships Have Sailed
Talking To Mum

This past week has been a particularly busy one with mid-term resupply happening from the 10th to the 13th of January. As resident social scientist, I am beginning to interview our departing team members whilst also engaging with the visiting tourists—three ships in total over this two week period. The ships sitting in the harbour punctuate the non-human landscape and bring about an exciting (and exhausting!) shift in pace for the 24-48 hours they are here. The crews from Heritage...

Carla Meurk
8 Jan 2011 - 20:50
Island Life
Human Interactions
Almost Scrapbooking
Christmas Decorations
Cup Holder
Washers For Cooking
Re-creating Photopoints

As we near the expedition’s halfway mark I have been thinking about the ways in which each team member expresses his or her creativity. Photography is a passion for many members, especially Shelley who has brought with her an impressive assemblage of photographic equipment in order to capture the island’s environment and aesthetics. The obligatory cooking tasks we share have been appropriated as an opportunity to showcase our culinary flare—a particularly fine art given...

Alex Fergus
8 Jan 2011 - 20:32
Island Life
I'm Not Alone
Turning To Leave
The Drop Down
The Kickoff
The First Beat
The Uplift
The Soar

Hi there folks, just a short one today, more of a photo blog.

As I was coming across the lower slopes of Menhir a whirr beat down above me as a Southern Royal Albatross landed somewhere immediately behind me. Let’s call him (or her) Roy for the sake of ease. Roy had not noticed me from above as I had been photographing some dwarf of a plant under the Dracophyllum scrub. As I got up with the sound of the landing, Roy did a double take, turned and took off out of there. Camera...

Shelley McMurtrie
3 Jan 2011 - 20:20
Island Life
Temporary Fix Up
Replacing Window
Broken Glass

2011 was rung in with a bang here on Cambell Island – literally. Mark Crompton and Alex Fergus were up very early on the 2nd of January (e.g., 1am) seeing in Alex’s birthday when they noticed the windows in the MetService lounge were flexing rather alarmingly. The next minute one of the windows crashed in, with glass going everywhere and the wind and rain battering into the room. A quick response from these two lads so early in the morning was quite commendable.

They...

Alex Fergus
2 Jan 2011 - 20:23
Island Life
Two Hoihos

Tramping back from Penguin Bay toward North West Bay hut we stumbled across these two hidden quietly amidst the shield fern and Dracophyllum. As it turns out the juvenile Hoiho (Yellow-Eyed Penguin) has a faint blue-grey eye, changing to the characteristic yellow as the bird matures. Natures wonders’ eh? There’s probably a very good reason for this, but I’ll leave it to the universe and it mysteries for now.

[Alex Fergus]

Colin Meurk
1 Jan 2011 - 20:31
Island Life
CIBE Team

The Island is small but it expands according to the difficulty of walking in the soft pillows of peat, moss and swamp. And there is so much packed into such a small space, and its ever-changing moods make Campbell Island such an intense and rich experience. Although movement around the island requires a high level of fitness many of the island’s plants and animals that contribute to its magic are readily accessible. This was most apparent yesterday as we sat on the jetty with...

Carla Meurk
1 Jan 2011 - 20:20
Island Life
Human Interactions
1984 Fence Line
Veg Meurk 84
Fieldwork Posture
Sticta Colinii
Southernmost Vegetation Plot
Dad And Sea Lion

On this trip I play dual role of field assistant and researcher. During the time I am assisting with fieldwork I am also observing and documenting scientists’ fieldwork practices. This participant observation constitutes one aspect of my data collection on scientists’ engagements with this environment. During the past week I have assisted expedition team leader (and father) Colin Meurk resurvey a series of vegetation plots that he began monitoring in 1984 when sheep were...

Alex James
31 Dec 2010 - 21:55
Island Life
Skua And Lens
Skua And Kicknet Cover
Skua Cafe

On the final day of 2010 we found ourselves working in Norton Stream which has the distinction of reaching the sea at the only significant stretch of sandy beach on Campbell Island (cleverly known as Sandy Bay). According to some of the expedition members who have extensive experience of the island, in this bay one would once encounter over 100 sea lions in a relatively small area and have to run a gauntlet of mock charges to get along the beach. However, it would now appear not so many...

Alex Fergus
30 Dec 2010 - 20:47
Island Life
Leopard Seal

Here is a nasty piece of work, not that I want to demonise Leopard Seals or anything, but they are worth being weary of. Carla and I stumbled over this fellow after returning from Camp Cove around the coast toward Tucker Cove. Leopard Seals are not common on Campbell Island, with only a handful likely to be seen in a given year. Those that come ashore are often injured, and take up on the island to convalesce. Leopards are pretty aggressive; they feed on other seals and birds, their...

Shelley McMurtrie
28 Dec 2010 - 21:21
Island Life
Bomb Shed
Bomb Shed Sea Lion
Bomb Shed Sea Lion Lunge
Bomb Shed Sea Lion Chase
Inside The Bomb Shed
Inside The Bomb Shed

Alex James and I had a substantial day in the field yesterday (12.5 hour day) sampling Garden Stream, so today was a day at base camp to recover and get ready for a four-day field trip to Norwest Bay tomorrow. I made the most of our packing day and slept in – refusing to get out of bed until 9am. I got up for breakfast to discover I had to wear sunglasses in the lounge with the sun streaming through the windows and pushing the mercury up to a respectably balmy 19 degrees. Almost...

Shelley McMurtrie
26 Dec 2010 - 21:54
Island Life
See video

Walking back to base on the Beeman Boardwalk tonight at 10pm I had a wonderful surprise. From beside the walkway by my feet I saw a flash of brown and something fluffy landed on the path in front of me. Not sure what it was (wearing no contacts today so everything was looking pretty blurry to me) I grabbed the video camera. What a surprise when I zoomed in to see the wee Campbell Island Snipe. This tiny strange (but very cute) looking bird was unknown to science until its discovery in 1997...

Alex James
26 Dec 2010 - 21:26
Island Life
Grey With A Hint Of Blue

Having been marooned on Campbell Island for three weeks now over early summer I feel I have a small amount of authority to discuss the weather. The weather here moves by with great speed so you can have a bit of everything over a day. Generally however, conditions could be best described as delightfully dull grey with periodic drizzle and a hint of blue-sky on the horizon that promises but rarely delivers any actual sun. The temperature outside regularly reaches lofty peaks of maybe 10...

Steve Croasdale
26 Dec 2010 - 20:41
Island Life
Technical Assistance
Beeman Point Base
Taking A Break

I first came to Campbell Island in 1989 for a recce, then several more times over the last 20 years. I was then supporting the meteorological programme by maintaining the essential services at the Beeman base (photo). For the Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition (CIBE) my role has been similar. We are occupying a still very sound building, first established in the 1950s, developed, but abandoned as a full time occupied meteorological office in 1995 when an automatic weather station was...

Mark Crompton
25 Dec 2010 - 20:45
Island Life
CIBE Team
Christmas Dessert
Mountford Wine - Christmas Selection
Christmas Cake

It’s Christmas Night 2010 and the Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition has been here for nearly three weeks. Carla Meurk and Alex Fergus put on a fine Christmas Dinner and as is traditional we all ate too much. Between the main course and dessert our Leader, Colin Meurk, put on a treasure hunt and it struck a distant chord from childhood birthday parties over 50 years ago.

After dinner I walked around to the old Coastwatcher’s Camp in Tucker Cove and it suddenly...

Alex James
25 Dec 2010 - 20:35
Island Life
CIBE Team
Christmas Choir
Rain Chases Everyone Away

Christmas morning on Campbell Island was a little different to past Christmases on the mainland I have experienced. It started relatively normally with a tasty pancake breakfast, but since it was a Saturday, our scheduled base cleaning day, after breakfast I was cleaning toilets. While there is nothing particularly difficult about cleaning toilets, it is probably not something most people would usually undertake on Christmas morning.

Once the base was spick and span, we then had to...

Colin Meurk
23 Dec 2010 - 20:10
Island Life
CIBE Team
Perseverance Harbour
Perseverance Harbour
Glimpse of I’le Dent
Koromiko and Onion Plant
Button Daisy
Aniseed-Smelling Carrot
Sea Lion on Front Lawn
Pipits
Feeding Time
Perseverance Harbour
Tucker Cove

One of the many memorable and distinctive aspects of our daily interactions with and experiences of Campbell Island is the ever shifting patterns of light, colour, shade, dark, gloom and even (!) dismal conditions.

The sun and wind continually play moody tunes on the sea, wildlife, plants and our very existence on the Island. It is not exactly subsistence; but there is deprivation – ambient inside temperatures are around...

Shelley McMurtrie
22 Dec 2010 - 21:41
Island Life
CIBE Team
See video

The NZ book titled ‘a river rules my life’ comes to mind down here on Campbell Island. Not because we are sampling streams, but because of the similarity to how our lives are completely ruled by a single factor - the weather.

The evenings end with Mark Crompton downloading the weather fax at 10.15pm and writing a forecast that is posted on the hallway wall the following morning. The day then progresses either along the forecasted weather route or can deviate remarkably...

Shelley McMurtrie
22 Dec 2010 - 20:54
Island Life
CIBE Team
Beeman Base
Beeman Base
Cloud Formations

The NZ book titled ‘a river rules my life’ comes to mind down here on Campbell Island. Not because we are sampling streams, but because of the similarity to how our lives are completely ruled by a single factor - the weather.

Days can progress either along the forecasted weather route (thanks Mark) or can deviate remarkably, although in our meteorologist's sage words (that's Mark), he is rarely wrong... What ever happened to that snow fall you predicted?

...
Steve Wagstaff
22 Dec 2010 - 20:28
Island Life
CIBE Team
Perseverance Harbour
Alex Fergus
Veronica elliptica
Damnamenia Vernicosa
Chiloglottis cornuta
Lyperanthus antarcticus

It is challenging to move about and work on Campbell Island. The lower slopes are covering with dense dwarf forest and chest high tussocks. The ground is soggy and uneven and a mislaid step can easily wake a napping sea lion. Most of the time they are only mildly annoyed, but some of the young males have a chip on their shoulder and can be aggressive. They’re large animals, with two inch yellow incisors, and they drool. It takes nerve to stand your ground when they come loping at you...

Colin Meurk
18 Dec 2010 - 21:38
Island Life
Terrestrial Ecology
My Honey
Dracophyllym Trees
Dwarf Forest Navigation
Weeping Mapou
Weeping Mapou
Lovely Bubbling Stream
Hymenophyllum Minimum
Spider Orchid
Spider Orchid

The Sitka Spruce planted in Camp Cove by Lord Ranfurly early last century has been erroneously reported as the southernmost tree in New Zealand. Of course trees go further south in Patagonia, but there are trees here already – it’s all a matter of definition.

Trees have been described as woody plants with a single trunk and canopy of foliage, a woody plant over 5 m tall and other height limits. The native heath trees on Campbell Island (2 species of Dracophyllum or...

Steve Wagstaff
18 Dec 2010 - 20:24
Island Life
CIBE Team
Perseverance Harbour
Orientation Walk
Megaherb Communities
Damnamenia Vernicosa
Leptinella Plumosa

The CIBE members live in the MetService Annex building which overlooks Perseverance Harbour. The Annex is quite comfortable, the inside temperature ranges a bit above ambient; chilly when its clagged in and slimy outside, but our main living room is oriented to capture the sun on fine days.

Meals have been feats of culinary masterpiece complimented by a selection of fine wines donated by our sponsor Mountford Estate. One would have thought, fish pie, chicken curry, brownies and...

Shelley McMurtrie
16 Dec 2010 - 21:02
Island Life
Yawning
Yawning
Dozing

Campbell Island is a place full of surprises. Today she was in a beatific mood and the wildlife seemed to be in the same mindset - the sun was shining, the day warm (hot by Campbell Island standards), and barely a breath of wind gusted. Steve Croasdale and I made the most of the calm water and launched his inflatable dingy and rowed (Steve did) around to Tucker Cove with the ContourHD in the water.

The local sea lions were most interested in this new play-thing and one spent over...

Alex Fergus
16 Dec 2010 - 19:45
Island Life
CIBE Team
A Hasty Retreat
Our Barricade
Too Terrified To Eat
Assertion Of Dominance
North West Bay Hut

Carla’s human impacts monitoring saw us advancing under glorious sunshine to North West Bay. We clambered up from the Capstan Cove beach, through the goblin forest of Dracophyllum (turpentine scrub), and were met with a bark. As Carla puts it, a young female sea lion took exception to our presence — conceivable, given she did her best to hurry us into the little A-frame hut she was defending. I am more of the view that this young lioness was a lone hut warden, embracing,...

Shelley McMurtrie
16 Dec 2010 - 15:37
Island Life
See video

Campbell Island is a place full of surprises. Today she was in a beatific mood and the wildlife seemed to be in the same mindset.

Steve C and I rowed (well Steve did) around to Tucker Cove with the ContourHD in the water. The local sea lions were most interested in this new play-thing and one spent over an hour playing around the boat blowing bubbles, trying to bite the oars, bunting the base of the boat, and splashing us with his flippers.

I have a lasting memory of the...

Carla Meurk
10 Dec 2010 - 21:45
Island Life
A nest For Two
An Affectionate Peck
A Return Peck
Playing Footsie
The Striking Couple

The ridges on Campbell offer some extraordinary views of expansive megaherb fields that end abruptly at the dramatic cliffs punctuating the coastline. Strong and icy winds whip across these exposed areas and hypothermia is a real risk. I am thankful for my wind and rainproof clothing and the ample supply of chocolate we have with us (thanks Swazi, Aspiring and...

Shelley McMurtrie
10 Dec 2010 - 20:50
Island Life
CIBE Team
HMNZS Otago in Perseverance
Offloading from the Wellington
Clearing the lower winch track
Clearing the upper winch track
The locals looking on
The trolley winch
Quarantine time

I am sitting here in relative luxury in the MetService Hostel on Campbell Island, with a light on, the computer going, and the dulcet tones of Fat Freddys Drop playing – all thanks to the wiring genius of Steve Croasdale and Wayne (MetService chaps) plus our cute wee generator. The base is cold though with no heating - not too much difference between inside and outside temps (burr).

We arrived at Campbell Island two days ago with snow on the hills and it continued to snow off...

Alex Fergus
10 Dec 2010 - 19:45
Island Life
CIBE Team

3 days of unpacking and prepping has been followed by 32 hours on a rolling ocean (up to sea-state 5 in navy speak). The seventy five percent of the team that remained bedridden at sea have risen, and spirits are high. Sleet has given way to snow to sun to wind to rain and now it’s calm on our 3rd evening. Until now our exploration of the island's biotic bustle has been limited, but come nightfall each evening a few of us have had the chance to start exploring the boardwalk...

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